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Students attending the University of California received an email informing them or the requirement to complete a Title IX training course.

The online training course must be completed by February 9 in order for the student to register for spring courses.

screenshot of title ix course survey university of souther california

 

While many students are concerned that the course is too intrusive, failure to complete the Title IX course would put their spring registration on hold until the course has been completed.

Campus Reform by Anthony Gockowski

A mandatory online course at the University of Southern California (USC) asks students to disclose the number of sexual encounters they have had over the past three months and teaches students to ask for consent by saying “how far would you be comfortable going?” and “would you like to try this with me?”

… ‘It was just full of super personal questions,’ Jacob Ellenhorn, a student at USC, told Campus Reform.

Despite some students being uncomfortable with the content of the course, the campus-wide email assured students they would ‘enjoy the assignment.’

‘We believe you’ll enjoy the assignment, and that this training is in line with our shared belief that Trojans care for Trojans….

Continue Reading — USC students required to detail sexual history before registering for classes

In other words, it is not up to the student to reach the conclusion that he or she enjoys (or does not) the course, the decision of which is to be determined by the thought police.

Students are right to be concerned that the information they are asked to provide is a blatant invasion of privacy and none of the school’s business.

screenshot of title ix course survey university of souther california 002

 

Some of the Title IX survey questions ask: “If you had sex (including oral) in the last 3 months, how many times had you used a condom?”

The course interrogates the student about individual’s alcohol, drugs, sex including the number of sexual partners in a three-month period. Followed up by questions about the student’s use of condoms, “If you had sex (including oral) in the last 3 months, how many times had you used a condom?”

Such probing has little to do with the so-called concerns of sexual assaults on campus and more to do with data mining and usurping an individual’s right to privacy.